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Expert opinions: SI joint therapy with SacroLoc Verifiable results

Issue 03/2017

Dr. Antonio Villaminar, orthopedist at Medical Health Center Schio (Vincenza), Italy:

Dr. Antonio Villaminar, Medical Health Center Schio, Italy.
Dr. Antonio Villaminar, Medical Health Center Schio, Italy.

“The first step in making a differential diagnosis is always to examine the patient to determine the exact location of the pain. In sacroiliac conditions, we are referring to pain that spreads out from the sacroiliac joints (SI joints) and can radiate to the groin and trochanter down to the outside of the leg. The symptoms worsen when standing and walking and may gradually subside. In any case, clinical tests are necessary to differentiate the pain that is not caused by a dysfunction of the sacroiliac joints but originates from neuropathic complaints such as osteoarthritis of the hip or cruralgia (stemming from the crural nerve). A full examination includes an MRI scan with fat suppression (STIR MRI sequences) to rule out an edema of the bone tissue. A blood test should also be carried out to rule out the possibility of a rheumatic condition or a vitamin D deficiency.
Treating a sacroiliac joint generally involves administering cortisone. Physiotherapy to stimulate and strengthen the pelvic muscles, laser therapy, and orthoses are other treatment measures. My recommendation for stabilizing the SI joint: Use the SacroLoc multimodally in combination with medication and physiotherapy, especially when the patient has to stand. The SacroLoc has proven more reliable compared to other orthoses and achieved verifiable results. The effectiveness of an orthosis should be backed up by clinical results. SacroLoc has shown better results compared to other products. Patients have a feeling of greater stability, which in turn relieves pain. They primarily feel more stable with the orthosis when the pain increases and when standing.”

Images: Bauerfeind, privat